Please eat the chicken

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Why Delicious Needs the Sherlock Fandom
Why the Sherlock Fandom Needs Delicious

(Let me say first that I loved Delicious for many reasons which I’ll detail later in a full meta/review of the film.)

Please go download Delicious right now, and, even if you haven’t seen it, give it a positive (5 star) rating. I’ll explain why that high rating is important in a minute, but please go rate it now and then come back.

Now go watch the movie. (TW: Bulimia. It’s not an easy, light-hearted romp.) When you’re done, go back to iTunes or Amazon and review it with a generous spirit. Pretend you’re leaving comments on a fic writer’s first novel. 

In other words I’m asking you to fangirl over this movie, to treat it like it was created by one of your fandom friends. (In essence, it was.) It needs likes and reblogs and comments and in the movie world that means iTunes and Amazon high ratings and thoughtful, constructive reviews.

Delicious is not a Hollywood blockbuster; it’s a micro-budget indie film starring Louise Brealey (Molly Hooper from Sherlock). It’s Tammy Riley-Smith’s first feature-length film. She wrote, directed, and co-produced it. That’s right. A woman made a movie starring a woman. This almost never happens. I’m not exaggerating. 

Women comprised 6% of all directors working on the top 250 films of 2013. This represents a decrease of 3 percentage points from 2012 and 1998. Ninety-three percent (93%) of the films had no female directors.

Only 11% of all clearly identifiable protagonists are female (x) [see also (x) (x)]

11% of protagonists in the top 250 films are female. Let me repeat. Only a paltry 11 out of 100 protagonists in Hollywood blockbusters are female. So where are you going to see them (us)? Indie films, full stop. 

So Delicious needs YOU, the amazing Sherlock fandom, to give it a boost so that a wide audience can even get the chance to see it and make up their own minds about the content. Delicious needs YOU to rate the film highly so people who might need a nudge think— “oh— hey other people think it’s worth my time to see this flick. I’ll buy or rent it.” Delicious needs you to actually pay for it and not ever even THINK of pirating it. 

Delicious needs the Sherlock fandom. But why does the Sherlock fandom need Delicious?

Do you like Molly Hooper, the role Louise Brealey, a staunch feminist and the star of Delicious, plays on Sherlock? Do you like Molly’s spirit? You weren’t supposed to. Molly Hooper was a DEVICE before she met Loo Brealey:

[The character] that surprised both Mark and I…the one that took us by surprise and sort of lept up was Molly Hooper played by Loo Brealey who was really a one shot deal in the pilot just a device to indicate that Sherlock Holmes has no real interest in women and is a pretty cold and deadly sort of character. She was played to utter perfection by Loo Brealey and instantly Mark and I were sitting at the monitors going we’ve got to get her back and she’s REALLY hugely developed as a character. She’s never a massive presence in the episode but because of Loo’s wonderful performance she’s really cut through and she’s a real audience favorite and she’s really the one character that’s ours. The others are all from the canon. Molly’s ours. We didn’t expect to introduce that character. It just worked so that’s not a favorite [character] but the one we didn’t expect to love so much.” -Steven Moffat (x)

No, Moff, Molly’s not yours or Mark’s. She’s Loo’s. Without Loo’s talent and spirit Molly Hooper would have been a mere blip, just like most other women in film and television. 

Sherlock fandom, we owe Loo a HUGE thanks. You know what to do.

Not gonna endorse giving anything 5 stars sight unseen out of solidarity - but endorse everything else. How much money have you spent watching yet another perfectly fine movie without a single well-developed and interesting female character? Let alone a lead?

I respect reserving your rating until after you see it— I totally do. In theory we should only “endorse” what we’ve read, or seen ourselves. But I see this situation differently. Delicious is not getting a theater release so Amazon and iTunes ratings are IT. I see the whole Amazon/iTunes rating and review system not as a true indicator of the quality (whatever that means) of any film so much as they are votes— likes and reblogs if you will— that indicate that this film deserves you to stop scrolling and consider it. A micro-budget indie isn’t going to get the attention it deserves with, for example, a handful of stars and reviews.  

The iTunes algorithm that determines if a film gets featured is the life-blood of a movie like this. Just a few ratings and reviews got Delicious trending on iTunes UK— that’s all it took b/c the great majority of low-budget films that make it to iTunes get hardly any attention. So I’m all in— a film starring a woman I respect, about a complex female character, written and directed by a woman— well that’s a rare thing that deserves attention. I want to know about it, to watch it even if, in the end, I think (to my personal taste) that it’s a 1 star film. (In this case I think Delicious deserves the high rating.) 

Also getting it seen is the one way we can prove to all the assholes who said there is no audience for it b/c it’s a “woman’s film” wrong. It’s true. Distributors told the producers that nobody would go to see it. (That nobody cared b/c it starred a woman.) I’m serious. 

So I respect what you’re saying, and, in an ideal world, I’d agree, but I think this case— at least for me— warrants a solidarity click on the 5th star. 

(via trashyfiction)

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americachavez:

americachavez:

chris evans is like an endearing semi-educated frat brother. you know the one who makes everyone in the frat house take a course on sexual harassment and worries a lot about their diversity quota and put an obama sign on the frat house lawn

chris evans is the frat brother who cries every time he gets high

(via bijou-kitten)